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Current Exhibitions

Current Exhibits at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture

Living Treasures: A Celebration of Vision - At the Governorís Gallery
Since 2006, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture has awarded outstanding indigenous artists with the designation of “Living Treasure” during the Museum’s annual Native Treasures Festival. Living Treasures: A Celebration of Vision celebrates those awardees. The pieces on display from artists such as Lonnie Vigil, Roxanne Swentzell, Teri Greeves, and Robert Tenorio, stand as a powerful reminder that tradition and cultural practices thrive within the vibrant, creative worlds of New Mexico’s Pueblo and tribal communities.  
May 5, 2017 through August 25, 2017
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art
Sponge Bob Square Pants, Pac Man, and Curious George, all sporting a particularly Native American twist, are just a few images from popular mainstream culture seen in the exhibition, Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art. The free to the public opening for Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is on July 17, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm and the show runs through October 22, 2017. Featuring nearly 100 objects by more than fifty artists from the museum’s collections as well as others borrowed from collectors and artists, the work on view in Into the Future will be in such various media as traditional clothing and jewelry, pottery and weaving, photography and video, through to comics, and on into cyberspace.  
July 17, 2016 through October 22, 2017
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Jody Naranjo: Revealing Joy
The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture will host a solo exhibition featuring the work of current Living Treasure, prolific Santa Clara pueblo potter Jody Naranjo, in the lobby of the museum.
April 1, 2017 through December 31, 2017
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

I-Witness Culture: Frank Buffalo Hyde
Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture, Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness, divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out There; Selfie Skndns; and In-Appropriate. Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience. Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation. In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.      
February 3, 2017 through January 7, 2018
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery
The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.
on long-term display
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Here, Now and Always
Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest’s indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum’s collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.
on long-term display
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Upcoming Exhibitions

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West
opens August 27, 2017

Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans
opens December 10, 2017